Sirsasana (headstand)

Sirsasana significance headstand is regarded as among the most significant yoga poses. The inversion of this pose causes unrestricted blood circulation to the brain and increased. This brings ease of focus and increased vitality, nutrient and oxygen supplying energy to the head, clarity of idea.

These glands in turn modulate metabolism, development, blood pressure, sexuality and other body functions that are essential.

In yogic terms, the increased blood circulation to the head helps to awaken the Sahasrara (crown) Chakra (energy centre). Sahasrara is regarded as the most significant Chakra closely linked to, and affecting, all other Chakras and commanding consciousness. It’s when the Kundalini energy unifies with the Sahasrara Chakra that the yogi attains Samadhi, becoming enlightened and unified with god and the universe.

Advantages of Sirsasana

The increased blood circulation to the brain stimulates the pituitary gland which revitalises central nervous system and the head. The pose is thus used in the yogic treatment of many ailments, and is considered to have a profound effect on stress and other nervous disorders which can cause other illnesses.

The closing posture needs muscles in the neck, shoulders, arms, back and abdomen to be aggressive, which revitalises and reinforces the whole body.

Contraindications

Despite many warnings, including strengthening the arms shoulders and neck in addition to some practice balancing with a tiny bit of groundwork, virtually anyone can performs Sirsasana. Yet there are contraindications and Sirsasana should not be practiced by those showing these states.

The pressure of blood circulation raises to the brain and eyes. Hence it is significant the Sirsasana shouldn’t be practiced be those with blood disorders or high blood pressure, headaches, haemorrhaging or other brain. Sirsasana shouldn’t be practiced by people that have eye conditions for example conjunctivitis, cataracts, or poor eye capillaries. Sirsasana shouldn’t be practice by menstruating or pregnant girls.

Performing the pose

Should be tried when performing headstand there are a number of measures that must be reached before the closing pose. Included in these are developing equilibrium in the inverted position and building strength in the neck and shoulders.

The training measures will help develop the strength that is required in the neck and shoulders, and should be practiced until adequate strength is got to hold the location that is closing. Once the neck strength (and adequate equilibrium) is developed, the weight of the body should be carried by the neck, the arms and hands are just used for support and stability and aren’t used to carry the body weight. It is suggested to practice Sirsasana next to a wall until equilibrium is developed. In the closing location, in this manner, the heels can be brought into contact with the wall to prevent falling back. Kneel facing the wall enough far away that when putting the head into the hands, the hands are about 20cm from the wall. W!

Hen it’s uncommon as this could cause harm to damage the body since the height isn’t great, but be cautious not to fall the neck – remember to use the shoulder and arm strength to support the body weight. When learning Sirsasana, it’s strongly advised to seek aid and the guidance of a trained yoga teacher who can help support the equilibrium until sufficient experience is obtained.

Sirsasana – Training measures

Kneel on the floor. Crouch somewhat broader than the shoulders, and forwards and put the elbows on the mat beneath.

Tuck the toes under and lift the knees from the flooring, spreading the body weight between the legs and back. While learning, use the weight to be supported by the arms so the total body weight isn’t on the neck.

Walk the feet nearer to the head, going the buttocks above the head and straightening the back.

From here, walk the thighs close to the torso, toes on the mat. Lift one foot from the mat at a time investigating the balance and counter balance of the moves.

Sirsasana – pose that is complete

Kneel on the floor.

Crouch somewhat broader than the shoulders, and forwards and put the elbows on the mat beneath.

Tuck the toes under and lift the knees from the flooring, spreading the body weight between the legs and back. While learning, use the weight to be supported by the arms so the total weight in not on the neck.

Walk the feet nearer to the head, going the buttocks above the head and straightening the back.

Slowly and with control, walk the feet in and bend the knees, bringing the thighs close to the torso.

Lift both feet off the mat, fixing the body with little motions, to counterbalance the weight of the legs.

Slowly move the feet upward, close to the buttocks, using the back muscles, the knees are pointing down and until the feet are pointing up.

Straighten the legs, so the whole body in aligned lifting the feet above the knees. This is the closing location.

Rest feet and the legs. Keep the back aggressive to support the spine and hold it right.

Rest the head and breathe.

By turning the sequence of measures leave the pose. Lower the knees to the mat and then the feet.

Relax in child’s pose with the head down for 1 minute to prevent dizziness which could result from the change in blood circulation to the brain.

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